They Didn't Ask Me (dr_phil_physics) wrote,
They Didn't Ask Me
dr_phil_physics

Apples Are Not Rubber Tires

"They mean well..."

Yeah, that's damning with faint praise. Consumers Energy is our local electric utility. The last couple of years they've provided lots of numbers and charts with the bill, comparing our house with other similar homes. Two years ago we were beating the pants off everyone. Last year, our most favored nation status died when I was home all day after 19 October. Fancy that -- people at home use electricity.

Latest email alert is for tomorrow. Funny how cool this summer has been if the last peak energy day was 22 July. I wrote back on the 27th: "Tuesday was apparently the hottest day of the summer in West Michigan, peaking at 92°F in Holland. Cooler later in the week. Then back up to 80-82°F and humid for the weekend." Originally I was going to do Kalamazoo tomorrow, but today was a lovely day to drive, so I did it today. That means I'll be home for most of the day. Using electrons.

Have trouble viewing this email? Click here.


Join your neighbors in reducing energy use on
Thursday, August 21 from 2pm until 7pm.
You used less than average but more than the most efficient homes on the last peak day.
Last peak day: Tuesday, July 22 from 2pm-7pm
Efficient
Neighbors
3.86 kWh
YOU
7.85 kWh
All
Neighbors
10.42 kWh
All Neighbors: Approx. 100 occupied nearby homes that are similar size to yours
Efficient Neighbors: The most efficient 20 percent from the All Neighbors group
What is a peak day?
During hot days when demand is high, energy can seem expensive. By using less energy during peak days you can help keep costs down for everyone.
Ways to save on peak days
Turn off the AC if you're leaving for the day
If no one in your household will be home during peak hours, turn off your air conditioning before you leave in the morning. Turn it back on when you get home — your house will cool off much faster than you might think.
Turn off and unplug electronics
You can't unplug some big electricity users, like your fridge. But did you know that you can save nearly as much by unplugging your DVR and game consoles? Try it out during peak hours to reduce your electricity use.
Use fans and reduce air conditioning
Fans can help you beat the heat while reducing your AC needs. Every degree counts. Raise your thermostat's setting by 3-4°F during peak hours and stay close to fans to help keep cool while lowering your electricity use.




You just can't easily compare houses that are empty with one's that have people in them. And yeah, eventually, despite the excellent insulation and the ceiling fan, the heat pump will go on.

My heat pump will go on. Isn't that a Celine Dion song? (grin)

Dr. Phil
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