They Didn't Ask Me (dr_phil_physics) wrote,
They Didn't Ask Me
dr_phil_physics

Living In The Future

I missed the first half -- didn't know it was on -- of Discovery Channel's The Science of Interstellar. It's a documentary tie-in with the movie, which I reviewed yesterday (DW). Even has Matthew McConaughey narrating.

We get to see physicist Kip Thorne, whose wormhole theories literally shaped the wormhole in the movie.

What's really funny, is that we're in the office of another physicist at Cal Tech and since I am typing on ZEPPELIN, Wendy's old laptop, on the rolltop desk, the TV screen is only about five feet away. At this distance, the clarity of high def is outstanding. And I find myself looking at the bookshelf behind the physicist.

I know that book! It's on my bookshelf at work. I used in once in grad school. It's Table of Integrals, Series and Products by I.S. Gradshteyn and I.M. Ryzhik. Same edition and binding that I have. Makes the CRC Table of Integrals look anemic, but as I always warned students, if you find yourself using Gradshteyn and Ryzhik, you're probably doing it wrong.

There's Goldstein, the standard textbook of Graduate Mechanics. This is the second edition, with the nice two tone binding. Not the more boring first edition. I have both.

And other familiar faces, so to speak.

Apparently I am easily amused. But how often does one see advanced physics textbooks shown on TV? I mean really.

Dr. Phil
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